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raspbeary:

off to see the wizard

(via unfathomablenihlist)

Emma Sulkowicz already deserves a MOMA retrospective

jacobblank:

not an exaggeration

crrabs:

*tries to get eight hours sleep in 3 hours*

(via iterative-persistence)

(Source: 1041uuu)

cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

(via urkraft)

College be like

ntbx:

Housing: $2,980
Meal plan: $1,457
Books: $1,429
Enrollment: $983
Air: $3,274
Grass: $4,284
Sidewalk: $5,284
The sun: $3,381

(via pandadorf)

uhohmarty:

Ice Covered Street Lamp on Mt Washington

(via killemdillem)

netlfix:

hash browns will be served at my wedding

(Source: netlfix, via eigenvictor)

see-plus-plus:

ten jiggabytes

artmagnifique:

KATSUSHIKA HOKUSAI. Bridge in the Clouds.

(via artisticazurite)

(Source: delriodelano, via aquatius)

(Source: 1041uuu)

allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.

Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.